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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
't -- when they have some control over the political system through their political action committees and republican control of congress, they can't cut entitlements now. when they do eventually become a problem that will require some immediate action, they know that it will involve higher revenues. and the higher revenues are going to be on them. if you check any poll, you find overwhelming support for raising taxes on people making more than $250,000 and raising taxes on corporations. and so i think they're trying to fend that off. bill moyers: obama campaigned on higher rates. and he won. why can't republicans come to terms with that that's how the election came out? yves smith: the republicans have become very dedicated to the idea that taxes in any form are bad. that when, in fact, there are times when taxes can fund productive investments and actually, again, lead to more economic growth. but it's the republicans and ironically, wall street, have basically adopted the same strategy of being non-negotiable. that if they have a blocking position, and they feel that they have a blo
rid of political action committee money, political party money, labor union money, corporate money. you know, i would go down to small amounts that are instantly reported, all transparent. i think we have to do that, because it is this money pouring in -- what comes out at the end is not representative of what the american people want. you know, the system gets skewed by these super influences, you know, whether it's the president pacs and the democratic's party pacs and the super pacs or the republican party super pacs, that's got to change. >> well, no ideas can make it as long as we're in the grip of an undemocratic process which determines who's going to make those decisions. >> one of the lines in my book is that all i'm trying to do here is put democracy back into our democracy. what our founders did that was exceptional was they decided, "we are not going to be subjects. we're going to be citizens. so, instead of the government telling us what to do, we'll tell the government what to do." and that only works if the people themselves have the power to decide who's going to be
and at the same time, you know, retain the name of action. you can keep doing things and be decisive. being thoughtful is not antithetical to being decisive. >> there was a scene that i knew immediately when we saw the movie i had to ask you about. lincoln walks from the white house to the telegraph center where he went regularly to receive messages from his generals and his reports from the battlefield. and he's sitting there almost as if he's talking to the two telegraph operators, but it's really a soliloquy in which he talks about euclid. >> euclid's first common notion is this: 'things which are equal to the same thing are equal to each other.' that's a rule of mathematical reasoning. it's true because it works. has done and always will do. in his book, euclid says this is self-evident. you see, there it is. even in that 2,000 year old book of mechanical law, it is a self- evident truth that things which are equal to the same thing are equal to each other." >> what led you to include that scene? >> i was fascinated to read that when he was already grown, lincoln, you know, we have a li
brittany could not hold the manufacturer accountable. everyone needs to be accountable for their actions. >> unmentioned to those in the room, alec was present too, in the form of a lobbyist with drug manufacturing giant glaxosmithkline. his name is john del giorno. >> several of the opposing testifiers today brought up very compelling, sad, empathetic stories. >> not only is glaxo an alec corporate member, del giorno himself islso a vice chairman of alec's national private enterprise board. the north carolina bill has been tabled for now. so now you've seen how it works for corporations. how about for the politicians? >> last night was, as the president finally acknowledged today, a shellacking. republicans gain control of the house, picking up 60 seats so far. >> when all of the returns were counted on election night 2010, alec was a big winner. eight of the republican governors elected or re-elected that night had ties to the group. >> guess what, i'm going to be governor of ohio. >> there's going to be a lot of news, and a lot of observers, that say that we made history. >> a clean s
... that particularly the actions in arizona and the mood, generally, of the last 18 months, two years, you know, has sort of raised the specter of anti-latino sentiment in the united states, but i wouldn't say that it's to the same level as the generations before. you know, for instance, just at a basic level, you know, in the year 2010, it's possible to be a doctor, an engineer, a lawyer, and it was in theory possible two generations ago but that really didn't happen much. it's possible now to go and conduct commerce anywhere in the united states as a latino. you're not going to be held back from that. so i do believe that this younger generation has many advantages that they should take advantage of and get as well educated as possible. what worries me sometimes, though, i will say, is that a lot of the younger generation-- not only of latinos but of americans-- i think doesn't have a sufficient understanding of the history of how we got here or a respect for the contributions that past generations have made so that they can have those opportunities. >> hinojosa: so for example, what is it that yo
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)

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